Notes - tyneholm
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tyneholm

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Finish on a High

If street photography were jazz, the high viewpoint would be a "standard"-something that consistently performs for you. Whatever town or city we're in, there is often something below our feet, and it's often something interesting. Look down from any elevated position and you can see streets, stores, walkways, bridges, canals, houses, traffic-all of which can provide interesting subject matter. ...

Whatever the Weather

Don't be one of those street photographers who only ventures out on a warm, fine day! Instead, view "extreme" weather as a good thing and the perfect reason to get out of the house with your camera. Snow, rain, ice, fog, strong winds, sunshine - anything but a gray day is great for street photography and adverse conditions can be turned into an advantage. ...

Set the Standard

In the pre-digital age, standard lenses were ubiquitous and were used for pretty much everything, from portraits to landscapes to street photography, but today they are often overlooked and under-appreciated. This is a shame, because it's a great piece of kit to use for street photography, and although this versatile lens has fallen slightly out of favor, it's still used as the primary teaching tool for photography students. ...

Shrink Things Down

Tilt-shift lenses are best known in landscape photography for generating extensive depth of field and keeping vertical lines straight. Another use for them is to create the "miniature" effect, where a scene is photographed so that it appears as if a scale model has been shot from close range using a macro lens. This has traditionally been achieved by using the movements of a tilt-shift lens to severely restrict the depth of field in the scene....

Mirror Mirror

Reflections have always played a part in street photography and they are all around us. When you are pounding the streets and there's not much interesting material catching your attention, look for reflective surfaces to make a great semi-abstract. You can use puddles, mirrors, floors, windows, shiny walls-in fact any reflective surface can result in a cool shot that causes the viewer to look twice. ...

Move It

Intentional Camera Movement (ICM) is an abstract style of photography where the photographer deliberately moves the camera during the exposure to create an impressionistic interpretation of the landscape. Instead of taking a sharp photograph, you are effectively painting with your camera-nature provides the colors, textures, and interest, and the sensor becomes your canvas....

Eyes Down

It is often said that we don't look up enough when we're out and about shooting. The same can be said for not looking down and, believe it or not, there's so much to be seen and photographed on the floor. Plenty of street photographers have created substantial projects based on what they have seen by their feet-and some of them are stunning....

Lose Focus

Orton first developed the technique in the 1980s in an attempt to imitate watercolor paintings. He did this by sandwiching two slides together of the same composition-one in focus and overexposed, another out of focus and underexposed-to create ethereal results. ...

Party Time

We live in a fairly hedonistic world where people are enjoying themselves at all hours of the day and night-especially in big cities. Think birthday celebrations, office leaving parties, bachelor/bachelorette parties, works nights out-in fact any excuse for a few drinks. In the summer months, people spill out onto the streets, which can lead to even more of a party atmosphere and sense of fun. ...

Speed Up Time

assignment you will be taking a break from shooting conventional still images. To convey time, movement, or change, it is better to capture a time-lapse sequence. This is a technique where you take a series of photos at regular intervals and then combine them into a continuous sequence to create a sped-up version of time....

Banish Your Fears!

We can all feel slightly uncomfortable photographing strangers in the street, and we all have different ways of dealing with it. Some people fight the feeling and shoot away regardless; some will just give up and shoot something different; others will learn a new set of skills to help them deal with such difficulties. ...

Make a Starburst

A sun flare or starburst can really add sparkle and impact to your landscape images. This effect shows the sun, or any bright light source, as a near-perfect star, with rays of light radiating from the center. You can capture the effect using almost any camera type, but using an interchangeable lens camera-with adjustable aperture-will give you more control over the look of the final image. ...

Show Off!

Most of us are guilty of having lots of good images stored on hard drives, which never see the light of day. This assignment aims to bring you out of the closet as a street photographer, inspiring you to bring your work out into the op n and show if off to a wider audience. So this assignment is simple: pick one of these ways to bring your work to life. ...

Paint With Light

If you enjoy nighttime photography, but have wondered what to do on cloudy evenings, this is the assignment for you. Painting with light is a technique in which you use a flashlight to subtly shine light on a subject, making it stand out from the rest of the scene, which will be in the relative darkness of the ambient light. ...

A Rat’s Eye Perspective

Shooting from eye-level is the default position for most people, but why not see the streets in a different way-through the eyes of a rat! Rats are known to be resilient urban creatures, so what better way to photograph a gritty urban scene than to get down to their level? You don't need to actually lie down on the pavement to do this-just use your LCD screen to see what you're shooting....

Shooting Stars

Nighttime photography has become extremely popular because of the excellent low-light performance of modern digital cameras. Your assignment is to head out after dark and shoot the Milky Way, the Northern Lights, and meteor showers! ...

Be Negative!

Pictures are sometimes criticized for having too much "negative space"-large areas of the frame with no "content:' But negative space is an important compositional tool in street photography and we should embrace it. ...

Shoot Film

Film has been around for almost 200 years, but have you ever shot a roll? Depending on your age and experience, there is a good chance you have only ever known digital capture. But for this assignment, we encourage you to return to the classic medium of 35mm film. There is something magical about exposing film, and getting back to basics is not only a good discipline, but a fun and rewarding experience. ...

Shoot Film For a Month

Despite the explosive advances in digital technology, film is still with us and it has made a comeback in recent years. Suddenly, people are interested in film once again and labs are dusting down their enlargers, community darkrooms are popping up, and film sales are rising. ...

Infrared Fun

Shooting infrared (IR) is a great project for the summer months, when many landscape photographers struggle to find subjects, because of the high sun and harsh, high-contrast light. However, these conditions are perfect for infrared photography, especially black-and-white infrared; blue skies are rendered as a deep black, which contrasts strikingly with clouds, while foliage turns a ghostly white....

It’s a Dog’s Life

Dogs have featured in street photography for years and can make terrific subjects. They don't object to having their picture taken (usually!), they will look you in the eye, and they often look cute. However, just walking around taking random pictures of random dogs probably isn't enough to hold anyone's attention for long-and it isn't exactly street photography. ...

Mono Magic

It may not be immediately obvious, but this is an assignment that will help you focus on the fundamentals of composition: shape, line, texture, and contrast. Without the distraction of color, these are the features that become important. They do, in fact, also underpin most color compositions, but in black-and-white they are vital ingredients of a successful shot. ...

Repeat That Please!

Street photography is often about making connections. Everywhere you look you should be looking for connections between your subjects and their surroundings. The connection can be obvious or subtle, literal or abstract, tenuous or direct; it just needs to be there. ...

Let It Snow

For this winter assignment, your brief is to experiment with the challenges and creative possibilities presented by snow. Snowfall can simplify the landscape, reducing it to a series of photogenic shapes, while disguising artificial objects or hiding ugly features. Virgin snow and hoar frost clinging to every branch and twig can create magical conditions. ...

Follow Me

How many times have you seen someone interesting coming towards you, only to react too slowly and miss the moment? Well, there's no need to kick yourself and abandon the situation. We all know that "stalking" can have unpleasant connotations, but in the world of the street photographer it is a useful tool at our disposal....

Stormy Seas

Observing the raw power of nature can be a humbling experience and few things demonstrate that power as spectacularly as waves crashing onto the coast during a big storm. Capturing these moments can result in compelling images that contain beautiful patterns and textures. ...

Turn Back Time

Like other forms of photography, street photography has trends that come and go, but we perhaps most closely associate street photography with monochrome images shot in the 1 940s, 50s, or 60s. There is something about pictures from that era that we find fascinating, and when you mention "street photography" to most people, these are the images they think of first. ...

Chasing Rainbows

Who doesn't love a rainbow? They are a beautiful sight and their relative rarity gives them added appeal. They are formed when sunlight passes through rain, with the raindrops acting as tiny prisms-when light reflects off the drops, it is broken down into a spectrum. Rainbows appear directly opposite the sun and can be full circles, although we usually only see an arc. ...

Play the Waiting Game

Broadly speaking, there are two approaches to street photography: you can "capture" an image (the spontaneous, reactive approach) or you can "create" one. When you create an image, you are in control of how the image comes together, maybe selecting the background and deciding what elements we need to come into play to make it work. ...

Mysterious Mist

Mist will simplify the landscape, reducing it to a series of shapes, layers, and outlines. Your assignment is to capture its effect, and then to select your best single shot. Look for an obvious focal point to either isolate or use as an anchor for your composition-maybe a landmark, boat, animal, or shapely tree. Shooting from a lower level, down amongst the mist, can also produce stunning results....

Juxtapose!

When people think of street photography they often think of juxtaposition-artistic contrasts where we have two elements in an image which are opposed to each other. This has always been a big part of street photography-so much so that it's perhaps in danger of becoming a cliche. ...

Heavy Weather

The saying "There's no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing" could be your motto for this assignment. The idea is simply to head out and take some creative shots in bad weather. Of course, "bad weather" will mean different things to different people, but for most landscape photographers it is probably any conditions where the light doesn't create some relief on the landscape....

The Unusual in the Usual

Street photography is often thought of as being whimsical, playful, or just plain funny. While you shouldn't rely solely on these "moments;' they are always memorable, so when you're patrolling the streets with your camera, turn your observation dial up to the max. ...

Beside the Seaside

Seaside resorts are full of picture potential. Artificial structures-such as harbor walls, piers, marker posts, seafront arcades, and jetties-add interest to the natural beauty of the sea and sand. In the summer, resorts tend to be crowded with tourists, making them a tricky place to shoot. However, during wintertime, or in bad weather, coastal resorts tend to be quiet, almost deserted and forlorn....

Ghostly Apparitions

Enter the world of the photo-supernatural and shoot some ghosts! The object of this exercise is to get to grips with shooting at a slow shutter speed, blurring the main subject, but keeping the background sharply in focus. Shot with care, it could make a lovely photobook, set of postcards, or framed prints. ...

Capture a Cityscape

For many people, landscape photography is all about getting away from the hustle and bustle of town or city life and spending time somewhere peaceful. However, it may be that by doing so they are ignoring some fantastic opportunities in the form of urban landscapes. ...

Funny Guy

Humor will always be central to street photography, and for some photographers it underpins much of their work. However it is difficult to work with because when you go looking for it, it's hard to find-but then it pops up out of nowhere when you're least expecting it. The key is to have a camera with you at all times, switched on and set up for a quick "grab" shot....

Shoot Buildings

There is a beauty in the untouched landscape and many photographers try to avoid including buildings in an attempt to suggest wilderness and isolation. However, human influence on the landscape is extensive and buildings can add a lot to a scene. So, for this assignment you should actively look to include buildings in your landscape photographs. ...

Let’s Get Critical

Critique-proper critique-is essential to our growth as photographers, but it can be hard to find. Put an "average" image on social media and the chances are it will be heralded with comments such as "awesome capture;' "outstanding;' or "just wow!!" But why? It's an average image. ...

Flower Power

Your brief here is to create a set of stunning flower photographs. Flowers are popular subjects, but are mostly shot in frame-filling close-up. Don't overlook their potential to provide colorful foreground interest in broad vistas. During spring and summer, flowers can be found growing in huge numbers at coastal cliff-tops, in woodlands, or as cultivated crops. ...

Like a Tourist

Mobile phones are ubiquitous and their cameras make a great street photography tool-they're discrete, portable, non-threatening, quiet, and we usually have one with us. It also makes us look like "tourists" rather than photographers, and people are so familiar with them that they will behave more naturally if someone around them is photographing with a phone. ...

Into the Woods

If you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise! Woodland interiors are full of picture potential, and for this assignment you will need to visit a local wood in pursuit of photos. The appearance of woodland can vary tremendously depending on its age and size, and also the season. Ancient deciduous woodland will typically provide the best photo opportunities....

In the Gallery

Get in among the artists! Shooting in art galleries-particularly contemporary galleries-is an art form in itself and can be highly rewarding. Okay, it's not on the street, as such, but it's still street photography. Major modern galleries are usually bright, cathedral-like spaces with light pouring in through skylights or high windows onto stark white surfaces. That means you are usually guaranteed good light. ...

Stay Local

It's tempting to think that you have to travel a long way to shoot landscapes and that only epic vistas will translate into great shots; that a shot only has value if it has been hard to create and shooting close to home is somehow "cheating:' However, there are great landscapes everywhere, and you shouldn't overlook your local patch, even if it isn't home to snow-capped mountains, glaciers, or vast sand dunes. ...

Into the Light

If you want to add some real drama to your street images, shooting into the light provides both a challenge and an opportunity. Usually referred to as contre jour ("against daylight") photography, the technique goes against one of the first rules you were taught when you started out in photography (don't shoot into the light!), but there are several benefits to be gained from breaking this rule: ...

Go Somewhere Famous

This is a challenging assignment and one that should really stretch your creativity. If you look at social media and through the pages of photographic magazines, you could be forgiven for thinking that there is a set number of locations and viewpoints to shoot and very specific compositions you have to copy. It is perhaps a valid criticism that there is little new in landscape photography. ...

The Urban Jungle

Street photographers have been fascinated by the urban landscape since the 19th century, when Eugene Atget introduced us to the streets of Paris with his evocative monochrome images. This type of street photography places more emphasis on the built environment than it does on the people, although including people in your shots can provide context or a sense of scale. However, before adding people, ask yourself whether they contribute to, or detract from the scene....

Road Trip

You don't need to invest lots of money in the best photography gear to shoot great landscape images. What you need is opportunity, and one of the best ways to get this is to go on a photography road trip. Revisiting the same places over and over can lead to overfamiliarity and complacency. So, if you suspect staleness in your work, look at a map and begin planning an adventure. ...

Up Close and Personal

Bruce Gilden, Dougie Wallace, and Garry Winogrand are just some of the street photography legends who have made a name for themselves by photographing strangers at close quarters. Their style is intrusive, provocative, and confrontational, and gives a whole new meaning to the phrase "in your face:' ...

Make It Your Own

There is currently a lot of discussion over the question of originality in landscape photography. With ever-increasing numbers of images being presented online, some feel that there is a tendency for landscape photographers simply to travel from one well-known destination to another, doing little more than copy other people's work. ...